I'm Bex.
I'm canadian and 18.
I like video games and anime and tv.
I plan to be Indiana Jones.
Hawke & Shepard Detective Agency
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not-the-canadian-average:

*hopes i look gay enough that girls will hit on me*

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tobeymacguire:

when straight guys ask how lesbian sex works i feel really bad for their girlfriends because if you dont understand how to have sex with a girl in any way other than repeatedly putting your dick in her you are having some really bad sex

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felifay:

Important scene of Makoto taking a shower...
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monsieurdangereux:

ThEY gOT THEIR LICENSES TOGETHER

GOD THEYRE KILLLING ME

Adventure Time #31

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Magic is real. I can touch it and command it and I need no faith for it to fill me up inside. If you are looking for your higher power, there it is.

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Chapter 85: That Butler, Glide
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ahvia:

growing boys (◡‿◡✿) … one of them, at least

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"Anyone who thinks they can hunt and kill us for money is gonna be put on another list, our list. They get to be a name on our deadpool."

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It will all be over soon.
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nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.

For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.

Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.

In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,


Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study.

This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave.

image via NPR

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— Canada has four seasons. —

factsofcanada:

1. Almost winter.

2. Winter.

3. Still winter.

4. Construction.

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sol-relay:

videogame graphic battle | vs. oldwolfs

round five ► one video-game series (mass effect)

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moriesartworks:

jumping skills have finally reached thedas

+ bonus, warden and hawke aka jealous judging bitches club

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